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Liquor Laws by State

Alabama – We get to start off with one of the best ones. Beer and wine are not controled by the state, but spirits are. On and off-premise liquor sales are limited to 2 A.M on Sundays. Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets but spirits can not. As stated above alcohol can be served 24hrs unless restricted by local ordinances, 26 of Alabamas 67 counties allow no alcholol to be sold, though posession and consumption remains legal. Here comes the best part: there is a 6% ABV cap on beer sales, bottles can also not exceede 16oz. Wine also faces a 14.9% ABV limit. So Jimmy can get wasted on some 40% ABV Jack but cant get a good beer if it happens to excede 6% ABV…such wise laws. Homebrewing is also currently illegal in Alabama, though the fine homebrewers of that state are working to ammend this.

Alaska – No alcohol is state controlled here. On and off-premise sales are from 8 A.M. to 5 A.M. Liquor sale is not allowed in grocery stores. Simple and sweet.

Arizona – No alcohol is state controlled in Arizona. Sale is permitted from 6 A.M. to 2 A.M. Monday – Saturday, 10 A.M. to 2 A.M. Sunday. Drive through liquor stores are legal.

Arkansas – Distribution is not state controlled. On-premise sale is rather complicated with Class A Private Clubs able to serve 7 A.M. to 2 A.M., Class B 10 A.M. to 5 A.M., and restaurants 7 A.M. to 1 A.M. Off-premise is allowed 7 A.M. to 1 A.M Monday – Friday, but only until Midnight on Saturdays. Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets but only in-state produced wine is allowed and spirits are not at all. Arkansas has many dry counties but private clubs are exempt from this. Sunday and Christmas Day sales are prohibited (exceptions apply.)

California – Sales are not controlled by the state. Sale is allowed 6 A.M. to 2 A.M. Wine, beer and spirits are allowed to be sold in grocery stores. California has quite lenient laws about liquor promotion but counties can restrict sales with local laws. Sale of alcohol 76.5% ABV or higher is illegal.

Colorado – Sales are not controlled by the state. On-premise sale is allowed from 7 A.M. to 2 A.M. and off-premise from 8 A.M. to Midnight. Only 3.2% ABV beer can be sold in grocery stores. As of July 1 2008 off-premise sale is allowed 7 days a week. Liquor stores are only allowed to operate one location, and absinthe is legal.

Connecticut – Sales are not controlled by the state. On-premise sale is allowed from 9 A.M. to 1 A.M. (Monday – Thursday) 9 A.M. to 2 A.M. (Friday – Saturday). Off-premise from 8 A.M. to 9 P.M. (Monday – Saturday.) Off-premise sales are not allowed on Sunday or holidays. Beer can be sold in grocery stores.

Delaware – Sales are not controlled by the state. On-premise sale is allowed from 9 A.M. to 1 A.M. off-premise 9 A.M. to 1 A.M. (Monday – Saturday) Noon to 8 P.M (Sunday, subject to local ordinances.) Holiday sale is not allowed, nor any off-premise sale outside of a licensed liquor store, taproom or brewpub. Persons under 21 are not allowed into any off-premise licensed venue period.

Florida – Sales is not controlled by the state. State law prohibits on/off-premise sale between 1 A.M and 7 A.M. unless the county decides to change the operating hours. For example Miami-Dade County liquor stores may operate 24 hours a day. Beer, wine, and low alcohol liquors can be purchased at grocery stores. Spirits greater than 76.5% ABV are illegal.

Georgia – Has some interesting laws. Sales are not controlled by the state. Hours of sale are determined by County. Beer with ABV above 14% is illegal. No Sunday off-premise sales. Certain areas public consumption is legal but has the following limitations: One drink on street, size no more than 16 oz, drinking from a can, bottle or glass is prohibited. Pretty damn prohibitive to do something that is on the books as legal…

Hawaii – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 11:50 A.M. to 6 A.M if you have to proper cabaret licensing. Off-premise sale from 11:50 A.M to 12 A.M. Spirits, beer and wine can be sold in grocery stores.

Idaho – Spirit sales is controlled by the state. On-premise sales from 10 A.M. to 1 A.M. Beer and wine can be sold in grocery stores. Beverages exceeding 16% ABV can only be sold in State dispensirys or contracted stores.

Illinois – Sale is not state controlled. On-premise sales from 6 A.M. to 4 A.M. All beverages can be sold in grocery stores. All sales laws are up to local municipalities. Sales on Sunday are not allowed until 11 A.M.

Indiana – Sales are not controlled by the state. On-premise from 7 A.M. to 3 A.M. (Monday – Saturday) 10:30 A.M. to 12:30 A.M. (Sunday.) Off-premise from 7 A.M. to 3 A.M., no off-premise sales on Sunday. No sales on Christmas, New Years Day, or election day prior to polls closing. Alcohol can be sold in supermarkets.

Iowa – Spirit sales are controlled by the state. On/off-premise sale is allowed 6 A.M. to 2 A.M. (Monday – Saturday) 8 A.M. to 2 A.M. (Sunday.) Grocery store alcohol sales are permitted. All beer greater than 6% ABV must be shipped from the state warehouse.

Kansas – The state does not control liquor distribution, but the still have some of the strictest laws in the nation. All alcohol was prohibited from 1881 -1948 and on-premise sale was prohibited from 1881 – 1987. Sunday sales have only been allowed since 2005. In counties that allow on-premise sale it is from 9 A.M. to 2 A.M. off-premise from 9 A.M. to 11 P.M (Monday – Saturday) Noon to 7/8 P.M.. 29 Counties do not allow on-premise sale, 59 Counties only allow it if the establishment makes at least 30% of its profits from alcohol, only 17 Counties allow sale with out restriction. Sales are prohibited on Memorial Day, Labor Day, Independence Day,  Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter. Only 3.2% ABV beer is available at grocery stores.

Kentucky – For a place that some fine American Whiskey is supposed to come from Kentucky has some insane laws. Sale is not state controlled. On-premise is allowed from 6 A.M. to 4 A.M. off-premise from 6 A.M. to 2 P.M.. Alcohol can be sold in grocery stores. This is where it gets fun. All ordinances are subject to local laws, only Louisville allows on-premise sale from 2 – 4 A.M., as of 2005 Sunday sales are allowed, but can be overrulled locally. 53 Counties are completely dry where even posession is illegal. 16 Counties have some cities that allow sales. Another 21 Counties only allow specialiy sales such as wine from wineries. There are only 5 Counties arround the major cities that fully allow sales.

Louisiana – Sale is not state controlled. There are no restrictions of on or off-premise sale unless municipality decides on-premise sale must stop at 2 P.M. Off-premise sale is allowed in grocery stores and all other licensed stores. These sales can be 24/7 and no municipality can challenge this. In New Orleans you can drink alcohol in plastic cups in public and if allowed by the bar take your drinks from one bar to the next. Many places allow consumption of packaged beverages on the street but it is up to the municipality. Most bars can be entered at 18 though of course you must be 21 to purchase and consume alcohol.

Maine – Spirits sale is controlled by the state. On-premise hours are 6 A.M. to 1 A.M. (Monday – Saturday) 9 A.M. to 1 A.M (Sunday.) You can buy beer in wine in grocery stores. Wine with ABV > 15.5% must be sold in state contracted stores. Alcohol sale is not permitted after 1 A.M. any day.

Maryland – Laws in Maryland vary quite a bit by locality, sale is not state controlled. Some counties prohibit sale on Sunday, others do not. Some places restrict alcohol heavily but there are no completely dry counties. Some alcohol is allowed to be sold in grocery stores in some counties.

Massachusetts – Distribution is not state controlled. On-premise sale is allowed from 8 A.M. to 1 A.M. (2 A.M. in Boston.) Off-premise is 8 A.M. to 11 P.M. Sunday sales on and off-premise start at Noon. Cities have the authority to shorten these times.  Some convenience stores are licensed to sell beer, but not grocery stores or gas stations. Happy hours are prohibited and you can only purchase two drinks per individual at one time on-premise.

Michigan – Spirits sale is controlled by the state. On and off-premise sales are allowed from 7 A.M. to 2 A.M and Noon to 2 A.M. Sundays. Any liquor can be sold at grocery stores and convenience stores except gas stations in Wayne County. Sale of liquor after 9 P.M. on December 24 and all of Christmas day is prohibited. On-premise sales January 1 are allowed until 4 A.M.

Minnesota – The state does not control sale. On-premise sale is allowed from 8 A.M. to 2 A.M. Off-premise from 8 A.M. to 10 P.M. and no off sale on Sunday. Local ordinances can change off sale hour allowances and growler sale is allowed until 10 P.M.

Mississippi – Spirits distribution is controlled by the state. Mississippi is a very regulated state and sale hours are fixed by local municipalities. Beer can be sold in grocery stores, but wine > 6% ABV can only be sold in state controlled stores. Sale is prohibited on Christmas day but they also have no open container law as a state. You can get free alcohol in the 24/7 coastal casinos. In most counties Sunday sales are prohibited and there are even some dry counties.

Missouri – Has some very permissive alcohol laws. Alcohol is not state controlled. On-premise sale from 6 A.M to 1:30 A.M. (Monday – Saturday) 9 A.M. to 12 A.M. (Sunday). St. Louis and Kansas City and a few other counties can operate from 6 A.M. to 3 A.M. daily. Off-premise sale from the same times including bars allowed to double as liquor stores in St. Louis and Kansas City which can remain open until 3 A.M. There are no state open container laws, no blue (sabbath) laws, public intoxication laws, and absinthe is not prohibited. There are no dry counties, and prohibiting off-premise sale is illegal. State laws preempt local laws. Grocery stores and gas stations can sell liquor with the only limitation being operating hours. Parents and guardians may give their children alcohol. There is no prohibition of consumption by minors, though purchase, possession and intoxication by minors is illegal. Open containers are allowed on Kansas City’s Power and Light District. You may manufacturer up to 100 gallons of liquor for personal use with no state permits or taxes.

Montana – Spirits are regulated by the state though beer and wine may be sold at grocery stores so long as it is < 16% ABV. Above that wine must be sold at state controlled stores. On-premise sale is limited to 2 A.M.

Nebraska – Sale is not controlled by the state. On and off-premise sale is allowed from 6 A.M. to 1 A.M. though you can not purchase hard liquor on Sunday before noon. Omaha has repealed the  Sunday hard alcohol law. All alcohol can be purchased in grocery stores.

Nevada – State does not control distribution and there are very few laws except for age. Stores can be open 24 hours a day and liquor can be sold in grocery and convenience stores. Public intoxication is legal and making any local laws to change this is prohibited.

New Hampshire – Spirit sales is controlled by the state. On-premise sale is from 6 A.M. to 1 A.M. off-premise until 11:45 P.M. Beer can be sold in grocery stores, but there is a cap of 12% ABV for beer sold anywhere in the state. Liquor is sold in state run stores that strangely enough can be located along highway rest areas.

New Jersey – Sale is not controlled by the state. Hours of sale are regulated by each municipality. Beer and wine can occasionally be sold in grocery stores. There are some dry counties particularly in the southern part of the state.

New Mexico – Sale is not state controlled. On-premise sale from 7 A.M. to 2 A.M. and off-premise until Midnight except on Sundays no sale is permitted on or off-sale. Stores can apply for on and off-premise licenses to allow for Sunday sales if their municipality allows it but sale on Christmas is never permitted. Alcohol can be sold in grocery stores. Parents, legal guardians and adult spouses are allowed to give minors alcohol within private property of their control.

New York – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 8 A.M to 4 A.M. Off-premise beer always available except 3-8 A.M Sundays, wind & spirits 9 A.M to Midnight Monday – Saturday, Noon to 9 P.M Sunday. Beer can only be sold in supermarkets and wine/spirits can only be purchased at liquor stores.

North Carolina – Spirits are controlled by the state. On-premise sale is allowed any time except 2 A.M. to 7 A.M Monday – Saturday and 2 A.M. to Noon Sunday. Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets but only state run stores can sell liquor hours are Monday – Saturday 11 A.M to 9 P.M. There is a 15% ABV limit on beer.

North Dakota – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale is allowed from 8 A.M. to 2 A.M. Monday – Saturday and Noon to 2 A.M Sunday. Off-premise sale appears to be allowed until 2 A.M. Sales are limited on Thanksgiving, Christmas and Christmas Eve.

Ohio – Spirit sales are controlled by the state. On-premise  5:30 A.M. to 2:30 A.M. and Off-premise from 5:30 A.M. to 1 A.M. Grocery stores can sell all forms of alcohol.  Though the sate controls some sales it licenses private businesses for a fee. There is a 12% ABV limit on beer.

Oklahoma – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 6 A.M. to 2 A.M. and Off-premise sale from 10 A.M to 9 P.M. Only 3.2% beer can be sold in supermarkets and any beer over 4% can only be sold at room temperature in liquor stores which are closed Sundays and some holidays. As of 2007 stores are open on election days.

Oregon – Spirit sales is controlled by the state. On and Off-premise sale is allowed from 7 A.M. to 2:30 A.M. and beer and wine can be sold at supermarkets. Liquor is only available at state run liquor stores.

Pennsylvania – Wine and spirits sales are controlled by the state. On-premise sale is allowed from 7 A.M. to 2 A.M. Monday – Saturday and 11 A.M. to 2 A.M Sunday with a special permit and if non alcohol sales are at least 30%, private clubs can sell until 3 A.M. Wine and spirits can only be purchased in state run liquor stores that operate from 9 A.M to 10 P.M. Monday – Saturday and Noon to 5 P.M. Sunday. Liquor permits for events appear to be complex and limited.

Rhode Island – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale is allowed until 2 A.M. Off-premise sale is allowed from 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. Monday – Saturday and Noon to 6 P.M. Sunday. Alcohol can only be sold in liquor stores.

South Carolina – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale hours are controlled locally and vary. Beer and low alcohol wine can be sold 24 hours, liquor can be sold 9 A.M. to 7 P.M. Monday – Saturday at liquor stores. 17.5%  ABV cap on beer and 16% on wine. No liquor sales on election day.

South Dakota – Sale is not controlled by the state. Sale of alcohol is allowed in supermarkets. 14% ABV limit on beer.

Tennessee – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 8 A.M. to 3 A.M. Monday – Saturday and 10 A.M. to 3 A.M. Sunday. Off-premise sale from 8 A.M. to 11 P.M. except Sundays. Beer can be sold in supermarkets and interestingly enough open container laws only apply to the driver of a vehicle not their passengers.

Texas – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale 7 A.M. to Midnight or 2 A.M. Beer can be sold Off-premise from 7 A.M. to Midnight Monday – Friday,  7 A.M. to 1 A.M. Saturday, and Noon to Midnight Sunday. Hard liquor can be sold 10 A.M. to 9 P.M. Monday – Saturday. Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets. Alcohol > 15.5% ABV require additional licensing and on-premise beverages sold on Sunday between 10 A.M. and Noon must be accompanied by food.

Utah – Sale is controlled by the state. On-premise sale of liquor is allowed by restaurants from noon to to midnight and beer from 10 A.M to 1 A.M. private clubs can serve liquor the same hours as beer is allowed for restaurants. Off-premise sales vary but are all state run and close no later than 10 P.M and are not open on Sundays. 3.2% ABV beer can be sold in supermarkets. Resturants and clubs must buy alcohol from state run stores at retail price and no alcohol can be served with out food. Only 3.2% ABV beer can be on tap and keg sales are banned. Alcohol can not be serverd on election day untill after 8 P.M.

Vermont – Spirit sale is controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 8 A.M. to 2 A.M. and Off-premise from 6 A.M to midnight. Beer < 8% ABV and wine < 16% can be sold in supermarkets. Liquor is only available at state run stores.

Virginia – Spirits are controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 6 A.M. to 2 A.M. no restrictions for licensed clubs. Off-premise from 6 A.M. to midnight. Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets. Liquor and wine > 14% ABV can only be sold in state liquor stores. Sunday sale is prohibited in some counties.

Washington – Spirit sale is controlled by the state. All sale is allowed from 6 A.M. to 2 A.M. local restrictions may apply. Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets but liquor can only be sold in state run liquor stores from 8 A.M. to 11 P.M. and some stores are open from noon to 5 P.M. Sunday, State stores are closed on federal holidays.

West Virginia – Spirit sales are controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 7 A.M. to 3:30 A.M. and noon to 3 A.M. Sundays. Supermarkets can sell beer and wine. 6% ABV limit on beer and 95% limit on spirits. State does not operate stores but controlls distribution of spirits.

Wisconsin – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise from 6 A.M to 2 A.M. Sunday – Thursday but until 2:30 A.M. Friday – Saturday, no closing time on New Year’s Day. Off-premise from 8 A.M to midnight for beer but only until 9 P.M. for spirits and wine, as well as beer in some counties. Supermarkets can sell alcohol. Minors are allowed to consume when supervised by parent or guardian.

Wyoming – Wine and spirit sales are controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 6 A.M. to 2 A.M. clubs with licenses can potentially operate outside of these limits. Alcohol sale is allowed in liquor stores only.

District of Columbia – Sale is not controlled by the state. On-premise sale from 8 A.M. to 2 A.M. Monday – Thursday, 8 A.M. to 3 A.M. Friday – Saturday and 10 A.M. to 2 A.M. Sunday. Off-premise sale from 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets 7 days a week. Singles can not be sold and liquor stores must be closed on Sundays unless Christmas Eve or New Year’s Eve fall on that day.

[Primary Source]